Gallery

Photos

Village Protection Wall built by SHOUHARDO in the Haor region of Kishoreganj. Photo; Pintu Saha, Audio Visual Officer - SHOUHARDO II

"SHOUHARDO Program - Private Sector's Contribution to Sustainability", 1st prize winner of the global CARE Annual Photo Contest 2010, by Asif U Ahmed, Director, Private Sector Engagement (PSE) Unit

Milk collection trough group activities in Strengthening the Dairy Value Chain Project. Photo: Islam Arafat - Project Officer (L&D), SDVC Project.

Handlooms are their livelihood: Sustainable and inclusive business means a better tomorrow for the Rug workers at Rangpur. Photo: Faisal Khan.

"The Rist of Sangrampur", 3rd prize winner of the global CARE Annual photo contest 2010, by Akram Ali, Project Officer of SDVC Project.

Processing the corn grown as part of Income Generating Activities (IGA) in Tangail. Photo: Pintu Saha, Audio Visual Officer - SHOUHARDO II

An inspiring representation of women's increasing presence in the self-owned business world. Photo: Pintu Saha

'I have started my small business with the seed capital': FSUP-H provides training on income generating activities for women and help them develop small business plans. Photo: Rick Perrera

There are many ways to fight poverty. Isha Khatun of Doani does that through raising chickens. Photo: Pintu Saha

Shunita Rani, a beneficiary of SDVC Project, is counting her profit, made from her feed-selling business. SDVC works with 35,000 smallholder farmers in northwest Bangladesh to double their dairy-related incomes. Photo: Akram Ali

"Musthi Chal" - Savings Handful Rice everyday can make a difference when we do it together. Ultra poor Women of FSUP-H project in the Haor area of Bangladesh has demonstrated this difference. Photo: Robert Rebeiro

'Give us a chance...' : Gaining social legitimacy through sports. Photo: ITSPLEY.

A natural leader representing the poorest is raising issues during Gram Shava (Village Assembly) at Ramnagar, Nilophamari; a space to ensure civic engagement in the Local Govt. decision making process. Photo: Aynul Hoque Pramanik ,SETU Project

Md. Mamunur Rashid, a role model from Nafanagar village, Dinajpur is giving speech during '16 days of activism'. Photo: Hasna Banu - PDO, COVAW Project.

Cost of Violence Against Women (COVAW) Forum Theatre in Tangail, community awareness on resisting Violence Against Women (VAW). Photo: Marium ul Muntahara, L&D Manager - COVAW

An artisan from NCVI - a worker's and artisans owned social enterprise, sewing intricate designs on a scarf in Rangpur, for the Social Economic Transformation of the Ultra Poor (SETU) project. Photo: Ian Taylor

Cultural events of EKATA for Food security for the Ultra-Poor in the Haor region (FSUP-H) in Netrokona, Photo by Chandan Rebeiro

Doulotunnesa, a milk collector of Mahmuder Para Milk Producing and Marketing group, is collecting milk from the group. Photo: Akram Ali

An adolescent girl of Kandu para EKATA group, Rangpur is indicating her expectation during the setting of vision of EKATA to get more education through pictorial expression of Ashar Gach (Tree of Expectation). Photo: Rawshan Rahman

UK Parliament Member Rushanara Ali visits FSUP-H project sites in Kishoreganj. Photo: FSUP-H Project.

SHOUHARDO II beneficiary maintaining her Homestead Garden using skills received from the project. Photo: Pintu Saha - SHOUHARDO II.

Expressions of joy due to the great success of pumpkin cultivation in the barren, unfertile land known as the sandbar. An example of a climate change adaptation measure and economic development opportunity. Photo: Camellya Hasan - PRODUCE Project

Strengthening Poorest and Vulnerable Households Capability to Improve Food Security in Northwest Bangladesh (SHIFT) beneficiary prepares organic feed with her family. Photo: Md. Atikuzzaman, Technical Coordinator, SHIFT

Social Mapping, PRA exercise for SHOUHARDO II Beneficiaries selection - Chilmari Tari, Rangpur. Photo: Pintu Saha, Audio Visual Officer - SHOUHARDO II

Sumitra holds out a radish grown using funds from her community savings group. Using their savings the women are growing vegetables collectively and improving their family's diet. Photo: Richard Sloman

The Village Development Committee (VDC) meeting is one of the key features of SHOUHARDO, which has been replicated in other projects. Photo: Pintu Saha

Children in the ECCD centre used to build them as future leaders on the path of empowerment. Photo: SHOUHARDO II.

Garments workers being taught how to read by a facilitator at the WHEEL learning Center. Photo: Shukdeb Roy - Project Officer, WHEEL Project

Religious leader raising awareness about safe motherhood for the Safe Motherhood Promotional Project (SMPP). Photo: CARE Bangladesh

Community Health Volunteer (CHV) conducting Birth planning (BP) session at PWs home with her other family members

Women discussing maternal health issues within the CmSS model in the Safe Motherhood Promotion Project. Photo: Soman Moodley - Policy and Advocacy Officer, Program Quality Unit.

Food distribution to Pregnant & Lactating Mothers in Tangail; Photo by Pintu Saha, Audio Visual Officer, SHOUHARDO Program

For a mother, no joy is greater than the joy of having a happy and healthy child. Photo: Pintu Saha

Providing household counseling on maternal nutrition, infant and young child feeding, hygiene and care practices is core of the MYCNSI project. Photo: MYCNSI project

Child Health

Empowerment

Family Planning

Maternal Health

Enterprener

An Open Budget Meeting organized by the Damodorpur Union Parishad under Sadullapur upazilla, Gaibandha district. Photo: Md. Sarwar, TC-L&M, EU-Local Governance Project.

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

CARE Bangladesh distributes food rations to people affected by floods. Photo: CARE

CARE Bangladesh distributes cash money to people affected by floods. Photo: CARE

CARE Bangladesh distributes food rations to disable people affected by floods. Photo: CARE

When disaster strike, many are left homeless. CARE's initiative to build disaster resilient sustainable shelters for the affected families by flood and prolonged water-logging in South West Bangladesh. Photo: Shahidul Islam Khan

Refugees arriving from Rakhine state, Myanmar. Following the recent communal violence in Myanmar has forced more than 670,000 people to flee their homeland and seek asylum in Coxs Bazar, Bangladesh. The people who managed to cross over came with mere belongings, brining only what matters the most, family members and little savings to get by.

Right after their arrival, the refugees from Myanmar were faced with further difficult situation. It was late-monsoon, rain was pouring down and hundreds and thousands of women, children and men were living under open sky. As immediate emergency response, CARE Bangladesh reached out to 2,300 families with umbrellas to fight the monsoon, until basic settlements were set up.

Most of the refugees from Myanmar are settling down in make-shift camps in Kutupalong, Potibunia and others. But the late-monsoon is making still making their daily lives very difficult.

Refugees arriving from Rakhine state, Myanmar. Following the recent communal violence in Myanmar has forced more than 670,000 people to flee their homeland and seek asylum in Coxs Bazar, Bangladesh

CARE has set up a woman friendly space (WFS) at Potibunia Camp in Ukhiya, Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. The WFS supports Myanmar refugee women through counselling, psycho-social support, recreational activities and referral linkage. The WFS has been set up as part of “WASH and Protection Support for Myanmar Emergency in Bangladesh” project, funded by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), Australia. CARE is in the process of setting up some more WFS.

1/16/18 Potibonia Camp. CAREBangladesh.Women Friendly Shelter. Men are not allowed in. The women gather for games and an opportunity to share stories of trauma and need. Taslia [Taslia Akter, local NGO=Prottayashi] works in partnership with CARE.

1/17/18: CARE/FDSR Health Center, Balukhali Camp. Recording: CAREBangladesh_17_01_18_HealthCenterBalukhali.CONSENT.Tayeb (translating): This health center is for all illnesses. They treat pregnant people, diarrhea, and other illnesses also. They’re organizers so basically different people are playing different roles, you know. Some of them are maintaining the registration, the patient is coming and they’re getting the registration from people, and some of them are going outside to encourage people to come here. And once they will get here, she is basically a paramedic. So she will write the prescription, and in those cases they have some doctors here. So this is the role they’re playing here.

CARE Bangladesh, in partnership with the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW) has launched two Temporary Community Clinics for Myanmar refugees to provide sexual and reproductive health and primary health care services. The Clinics will also serve as Immunization (EPI) Centers and offer other government health services for women, men, adolescent and children. FDSR, one of our national partners, is providing support to implement activities on the ground. In line with the MoU signed earlier, the DGHS has committed to provide doctors and free medicines for the Clinics. CARE, on the other hand is responsible for setting up the infrastructure, and providing personnel like paramedics, ambulance services for referral cases and other technical assistance. CARE is thankful to Glaxo SmithKline for funding.

CARE Bangladesh, in partnership with the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW) has launched two Temporary Community Clinics for Myanmar refugees to provide sexual and reproductive health and primary health care services. The Clinics will also serve as Immunization (EPI) Centers and offer other government health services for women, men, adolescent and children. FDSR, one of our national partners, is providing support to implement activities on the ground. In line with the MoU signed earlier, the DGHS has committed to provide doctors and free medicines for the Clinics. CARE, on the other hand is responsible for setting up the infrastructure, and providing personnel like paramedics, ambulance services for referral cases and other technical assistance. CARE is thankful to Glaxo SmithKline for funding.

Potibonia Camp CARE Bangladesh, food distribution happens once in day in some camps, and they feed 8-10,000 people at a time, children first, then everyone else. The bowls and plates were given the refugees when they arrived since most came w nothing, not even cooking supplies.

Caption-CARE Bangladesh has been distributing cooked food - often door to door - to over 3500 people, especially women and children, living in different makeshift camps.

CARE Bangladesh has distributed cooked food - often door to door - to over 3500 people, especially women and children, living in different makeshift camps.

Potibonia Camp CARE Bangladesh, food distribution happens once in day in some camps, and they feed 8-10,000 people at a time, children first, then everyone else. The bowls and plates were given to the refugees when they arrived since most came with nothing, not even cooking supplies.

1/16/18 Potibonia Camp, where CARE's base is. Camp is 22,000 Rohinga refugees, more than half of which are children. One of the key responsibilities of the girls is fetching water many times a day. The girls are often bejeweled and dressed up. Child marriage is very common, most girls getting married between ages 12 and 16, and it is not uncommon to meet an 18 y/o w 2 or 3 children; this tradition is meant to protect the girls from rape and assault, and to begin having children as soon as possible. Few children attend schools and illiteracy rates are very high. Schools in the camps are really just getting started (BRAC), since the initial needs of the refugees - shelter, sanitation and food were first priorities.

CARE Bangladesh has distributed shelter kits and shelter tool kits to 1100 HH between December 21 and 26 in collaboration with our national partner RIC (Resource Integration Centre). With funding from CARE Netherlands and LDS Charities (Latter-day Saints Charities), this was the first round of distribution that took place at Potibonia camp (Safiullahkata/ Maynargona-2). As part of distribution, each family received the followings items: bamboo (24 pieces), rope (30 m), wire (25 m) and 220 sets of Tool Kit (1 for each 5 HHs). The tool box contained claw hammer (2), handsaw (2), machete (2), Tukri/Bamboo basket (5), shovel (2), hoe (2), and digging bar (2). Moreover, CARE has already provided necessary briefing and instructions to 4000 HH (1 from each HH, Male or Female) as to how to use these shelter materials and toolkits effectively to build better and stronger shelters in safer places to avoid risks such as heavy rains and land slide. CARE plans to distribute shelter materials and shelter tool kits to all 5100 HHs living in this camp site, within the next 3 months.

CARE Bangladesh has distributed shelter kits and shelter tool kits to 1100 HH between December 21 and 26 in collaboration with our national partner RIC (Resource Integration Centre). With funding from CARE Netherlands and LDS Charities (Latter-day Saints Charities), this was the first round of distribution that took place at Potibonia camp (Safiullahkata/ Maynargona-2). As part of distribution, each family received the followings items: bamboo (24 pieces), rope (30 m), wire (25 m) and 220 sets of Tool Kit (1 for each 5 HHs). The tool box contained claw hammer (2), handsaw (2), machete (2), Tukri/Bamboo basket (5), shovel (2), hoe (2), and digging bar (2). Moreover, CARE has already provided necessary briefing and instructions to 4000 HH (1 from each HH, Male or Female) as to how to use these shelter materials and toolkits effectively to build better and stronger shelters in safer places to avoid risks such as heavy rains and land slide. CARE plans to distribute shelter materials and shelter tool kits to all 5100 HHs living in this camp site, within the next 3 months.

CARE Bangladesh has distributed shelter kits and shelter tool kits to 1100 HH between December 21 and 26 in collaboration with our national partner RIC (Resource Integration Centre). With funding from CARE Netherlands and LDS Charities (Latter-day Saints Charities), this was the first round of distribution that took place at Potibonia camp (Safiullahkata/ Maynargona-2). As part of distribution, each family received the followings items: bamboo (24 pieces), rope (30 m), wire (25 m) and 220 sets of Tool Kit (1 for each 5 HHs). The tool box contained claw hammer (2), handsaw (2), machete (2), Tukri/Bamboo basket (5), shovel (2), hoe (2), and digging bar (2). Moreover, CARE has already provided necessary briefing and instructions to 4000 HH (1 from each HH, Male or Female) as to how to use these shelter materials and toolkits effectively to build better and stronger shelters in safer places to avoid risks such as heavy rains and land slide. CARE plans to distribute shelter materials and shelter tool kits to all 5100 HHs living in this camp site, within the next 3 months.

CARE Australia Chief Executive Sally Moyle and Oxfam Australia Chief Executive Helen Szoke along with Senator Claire Moore and Senator Sharon Claydon from Australia visited a number of Myanmar Refugee Camps in November 2017. Their visit cover different activity undertaken by CARE e.g. health centers, centers that treat children with severe acute malnutrition, WASH and others.

The interior of a typical shelter for the refugees.

She told no one about it. The only person was her eldest son, who was killed shortly after he got to know. His last memories were of his mother screaming his name after armed men had entered their home. “I sent my children away into the jungle and just went back to lock the door. But I was too late, two men pushed in the door and grabbed me,” Hamida says with tears running down her face. The words thereafter do not leave her lips easily. “They raped me,” she whispers. This was about six months ago, just after Hamida and her husband fled with their remaining children to Bangladesh to seek safety from mass killings and persecution in their village. But her life in the overcrowded camps is not the safe haven she had hoped for. Her husband left her for his other wife and she now looks after her five children by herself. Afraid of the threats she received if she dares to speak ill of him, she keeps quiet. In a camp of today more than 900,000 people, the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar became the site of the world’s fastest growing refugee crisis. Over 680,000 refugees made the perilous journey from neighboring Rakhine State in Myanmar into Bangladesh in just six months escaping violence, death and destruction. The concentration of refugees is now among the densest in the world. CARE has been working in the refugee camps since the beginning of the crisis providing emergency shelter, medical support, clean water, sanitation, gender-based violence support and more.

Arob is sitting in her dark and humid tent by herself. For the 17-year old, the four thin plastic and iron walls have become the boundaries of her new home and freedom. She is only allowed to leave these 8 sqm for about one hour a day. “Women are supposed to stay inside. My husband does not want me to go outside, where other men could see me,” Arob says quietly. She is not the only one in the camp of over 300,000 newly arrived women in Bangladesh facing such limitations. In a camp of today more than 900,000 people, the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar became the site of the world’s fastest growing refugee crisis. Over 680,000 refugees made the perilous journey from neighboring Rakhine State in Myanmar into Bangladesh in just six months escaping violence, death and destruction. The concentration of refugees is now among the densest in the world. CARE has been working in the refugee camps since the beginning of the crisis providing emergency shelter, medical support, clean water, sanitation, gender-based violence support and more.

1/16/18 Potibonia Camp, where CARE's base is. Camp is 22,000 Rohinga refugees, more than half of which are children. One of the key responsibilities of the girls is fetching water many times a day. The girls are often bejeweled and dressed up. Child marriage is very common, most girls getting married between ages 12 and 16, and it is not uncommon to meet an 18 y/o w 2 or 3 children; this tradition is meant to protect the girls from rape and assault, and to begin having children as soon as possible. Few children attend schools and illiteracy rates are very high. Schools in the camps are really just getting started (BRAC), since the initial needs of the refugees - shelter, sanitation and food were first priorities.

2017_ CARE Launches Two Community Clinics in Cox

One year of Myanmar Refugee Crisis

One year of Myanmar Refugee Crisis

One year of Myanmar Refugee Crisis

One year of Myanmar Refugee Crisis

One year of Myanmar Refugee Crisis

CARE Bangladesh CD visiting camps

Heavy Rains in the Camp

One year of Myanmar Refugee Crisis

Implemented by CARE Bangladesh, USAID Bangladesh's PRERONA project, has set up hand wash stations to combat the spread of COVID-19 in Union Health and Family Welfare Centres (UHFWC), UNO Office and Upazila Health Complex (UHC) in Maheshkhali, Cox’s Bazar. World Health Organization (WHO) has advised to wash hands regularly for 20 seconds with soap and water to protect yourself and to prevent further spreading the virus to others. Global health experts have stated that one of the most important ways to prevent catching COVID-19 is through regular and effective hand hygiene.

Implemented by CARE Bangladesh, USAID Bangladesh's PRERONA project, has set up hand wash stations to combat the spread of COVID-19 in Union Health and Family Welfare Centres (UHFWC), UNO Office and Upazila Health Complex (UHC) in Maheshkhali, Cox’s Bazar. World Health Organization (WHO) has advised to wash hands regularly for 20 seconds with soap and water to protect yourself and to prevent further spreading the virus to others. Global health experts have stated that one of the most important ways to prevent catching COVID-19 is through regular and effective hand hygiene.

Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Awareness Session is being conducted along with precaution and awaressness for coronavirus in Rohingya Refugee camp at Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Awareness Session is being conducted along with precaution and awaressness for coronavirus in Rohingya Refugee camp at Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

Natural Leader demonstrates hand washing practices among participants in Satkhira, Bangladesh under CATS 11 project in March of 2020.

Dr. Durber stands confidently in front of his room, which is decorated with his own quote of humanity, ready to welcome the drug users he works with on March 22, 2020. Dr. Durber is part of a program called, PWID (Prioritized HIV prevention services for key populations in Bangladesh).

Awareness Message by Saifuddin, Office Support Staff, CARE Bangladesh, Dhaka Office

Awareness message by Jafia Khatun, Finance Officer, CBEMCSL, CARE Bangladesh, Dhaka Office

In order to help stop spreading of the coronavirus, handwashing point has been set up at Women and Girls' Safe Space in Rohingya Camp, Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Awareness Session is being conducted along with precaution and awaressness for coronavirus in Rohingya Refugee camp at Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

PWID Project: Case worker Mst. Asma takes up a new role to ensure the drug users wash their hands properly, use tissue & throw the tissue in dustbin. About the PWID project:

Awaress raising, soap distribution and collection at household level. Cox's bazar

***Low res images. Suitable for online and social***

Awaress raising, soap distribution and collection at household level.

Videos

Video Title Publish Date
Tackling child marriage through advocacy Jul 5, 2020
Adolescent girls learn about health and hygiene Jul 2, 2020
Improving the lives of refugees Jul 2, 2020
Social Health Entrepreneurs (SHE) working on the frontline Jul 2, 2020
Micro insurance ensures healthy lives Jul 2, 2020
Artisans benefited through Living Blue Jul 2, 2020
Duck farming for diversified livelihood Jul 2, 2020
Rural women find success in crab farming Jul 2, 2020
COVID-19 poses an unprecedented threat to the world’s most vulnerable, including refugees and forcibly displaced people. This World Refugee Day, CARE Bangladesh continues to support Rohingya Refugees with disaster risk reduction, women’s empowerment programs, emergency aid and much more.Click on the video to learn more about Jamanida's story: Jun 20, 2020
Poor helping the poor: Big Heart Prevails In SHOUHARDO III Communities Jun 15, 2020
JANO's response to COVID-19 Jun 3, 2020
অল্প কিছু কাজ করি, করোনা ভাইরাস থেকে দূরে থাকি - Activities to prevent Coronavirus Apr 8, 2020
যেনে নিন কীভাবে নিজেকে এবং আপনজনকে করোনাভাইরাস সংক্রমণ থেকে সুরক্ষিত রাখবেন Apr 8, 2020
Protect yourself and your loved ones from COVID-19 Apr 8, 2020
CARE fights COVID-19: Preparations across Asia and its refugee settlements Apr 8, 2020
Voice of Lipika Das - Woman Entrepreneur under Krishi Utsho's EWYSEA project May 4, 2019
My land, my identity: Access to Khas Land Apr 30, 2019
Quail farming for rural women Apr 4, 2019
A day in Parul's life Mar 6, 2019
SHOMOSHTI for better agricultural practices Mar 2, 2019
Where the Rain Falls Feb 25, 2019
Health services at doorsteps for Myanmar Refugees Feb 20, 2019
Krishi Utsho Business Model_English Feb 19, 2019
A Tale of Living blue Nov 12, 2018
Increased income from improved technologies - Farmers’ Field and Business School (FFBS) Benefits Oct 20, 2018
One Year of Myanmar Refugees in Bangladesh: CARE Interventions Aug 26, 2018
HALOW - Health Access and Linkage Opportunities for Workers Jul 29, 2018
Monsoon update_Site and Shelter Jul 22, 2018
Nutrition at the Center Jul 15, 2018
Living with Monsoon-WASH plans Jul 15, 2018
Living with Monsoon-WASH plans Jul 15, 2018
Living with Monsoon - Site Improvement & Awareness Raising Jul 9, 2018
Living with Monsoon - Women Friendly Spaces helps prepare for Monsoon Jul 7, 2018
Living with Monsoon - Secure Shelters for Myanmar Refugees Jul 5, 2018
World Refugee Day 2018 Bangladesh Jun 20, 2018
CARE Bangladesh prepares the refugees to fight Monsoon May 6, 2018
CARE - GlaxoSmithKline Community Health Worker Initiative (CARE-GSK CHW Initiative) Apr 15, 2018
Rojea (on cooking facility): We don’t have a kitchen. We need to cook inside (our shelter/home). It’s difficult to manage firewood. We cook once to cover three meals. We can’t always go out to collect firewood. It’s a small shelter with tarpaulin roof. Firewood is a crisis. Mar 4, 2018
Asia (on shelter/winter): 10 of us live in this shelter. Kids don’t have clothes, especially for winter. No blanket. The polythene rooftop can’t protect us from cold. We need tents. Life is really hard here…no peace of mind. We’re urging you to help us. Mar 4, 2018
Asma (on shelter/winter): We’re from Burma. My husband was murdered. We couldn’t bring anything with us. We had to leave everything behind. I’m especially suffering as my husband is no more. Some neighbors helped me build this shelter. We’re suffering as we don’t have warm clothes. Please help us. Mar 4, 2018
Nurul Huq (on sanitation/WASH): Through this drain, water can hardly pass. People throw in water, rice etc. Bugs are growing here. Rotten food, bugs are spreading diseases. We can’t even walk on this road given the bad small. Mar 4, 2018
Bibi Aysha (on washing facility): We live on the hills. Most of us are women. We need to climb down to wash ourselves. There’s no bathroom down there either. We need to look for opportunities to shower where the tubewell is installed (=open space). It’s difficult. We need to check if men are around. Mar 4, 2018
Ayas (on washing facility): Here we have 20-25 shelters but no washing facility. Women need to go to any secluded place to wash themselves. They need to go to the nearby village to take a shower. Here we have space to have a washing facility. We’re here for two months. We’re yet to get a bathroom. 20-25 houses are here. Women are especially suffering. Please help us. Mar 4, 2018
Abdul Mannan (on toilet): Toilet is a major issue here. We need to go far to relieve ourselves. Women especially suffer during day time. They go to other blocks (= different zone of the camp) at night. Women are suffering. The temporary toilet we got is full in two days. It’s hard. We also have little children. We are many families here, so the problem is acute. We need bigger toilets for the families to use. Mar 4, 2018
Zubaida (on washing facility): We have 63 shelters here. We have only three toilets, one isn’t working. We need to fetch water from far to take a shower. The queue is really long. Women are suffering the most. Mar 4, 2018
Hasina Akhter (on tubewell): We have a tubewell here, 30 feet deep. Water supply is scarce. Sometimes we get sand mixed with water. It’s causing water-borne diseases. There are some tubewells, quite far. It’s difficult to fetch water from there every time. Mar 4, 2018
Ambia (on common diseases): Rohingya kids are suffering from diarrhea. Blood dysentery, nausea, headache, gastric, skin deseases, diabetis, piles…these are common (=for all). We know which disease after seeing the doctor. Mar 4, 2018
Selim: We came here from Burma. I cannot study. I don’t even know where the school is. It would be good to have a school here. Mar 4, 2018
Hasina (after receiving CARE’s shelter kit and kitchen set): Got tarpaulin, will build the rooft..got bed (=floor mat) to sleep with my kids…won’t catch cold. The pots we’ll use for cooking. Kids can use the plates to eat…glasses to drink water. The bowls we can use to serve curry. Mar 4, 2018
Easin (after receiving CARE’s shelter kit and kitchen set): We couldn’t bring anything from Burma (=Myanmar). We’re here for two months. They are helping us as much as possible. Today I got a tent (=tarpaulin), two floor mats, rope, pots, glasses. They’re helping us so that we don’t suffer much in winter, our children don’t suffer. Mar 4, 2018
Beneficiary/Refugee (name not known, after receiving CARE’s shelter kit and kitchen set): We will use the tarpaulin for our roof…floor mat to sleep…pots to cook and plates to eat. Mar 4, 2018
CARE Beneficiary (name not known, waiting for CARE’s shelter kit and kitchen distribution on 23 Nov): Ques: What brings you here? Ans: We are here to collect tarpaulin, rope… also we don’t have kitchen utensils like pot, spoons…we came here to get them. I pray and hope that you will support us more in the future. Mar 4, 2018
Beneficiary1 (name not known, waiting for CARE’s shelter kit and kitchen distribution on 23 Nov): Ques: Why are you here? Ans: We all received cards. Through that we’re getting one box (=kitchen utensils), tarpauline, rope. We’re here to collect that. Mar 4, 2018
CARE Bangladesh works to provide health services to the Myanmar refugees in Bangladesh Oct 2, 2017
The Silver Lining Apr 20, 2014
Botlagari Chronicle Apr 20, 2014
Shohojatri Apr 20, 2014
Living Blue: the revival of Indigo in Bangladesh Aug 1, 2013
Voices from Hazarigaon (English) Jun 11, 2013
Voices from Hazarigaon (Bangla) Jun 11, 2013
Voices from the Families of SHOUHARDO May 14, 2012
Making Money Off the Poor? Rural Sales and Consumer Products at the Bottom of the Pyramid Apr 17, 2012
2010 CARE National Conference: U.S. Sec. of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (2 of 3) Mar 14, 2012
2010 CARE National Conference: U.S. Sec. of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (3 of 3) Mar 14, 2012
CARE 2010 National Conference: U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (1 of 3) Mar 14, 2012
The poorest people are working hardest - climate change adaptation in Bangladesh Jan 17, 2012
Do you know where your clothes come from? Dec 20, 2011
Empowered Through Engagement - Asma's Story Jan 19, 2010
CARE BD meets with Ministry of Agriculture, Bangladesh Betar and BTV Jan 13, 2010
Shumi, Bangladesh - The Girl Effect Jan 13, 2010
Sanchita, Bangladesh - The Girl Effect Jan 13, 2010
Dr Helene Gayle - Ducks Float & Climate Change Jan 13, 2010
Food distribution after Cyclone Sidr - W Dowell Jan 13, 2010
After Sidr - Laurence and Jackie Llewelyn-Bowen visit Bangladesh Jan 13, 2010
Imagine This- India Sep 2, 2009
CARE Responds to Cyclone Sidr in Bangladesh Sep 1, 2009
Sachs talks about speaking with one of the greatest organizations in the world Sep 1, 2009
Adapting to Climate Change in South-West Bangladesh Sep 1, 2009
SOT Eric Harr 2 Sep 1, 2009
CARE Bangladesh's Response to Flood 2007 Dec 4, 2008
Cyclone Sidr - Emergency Response Nov 15, 2007
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