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Village Protection Wall built by SHOUHARDO in the Haor region of Kishoreganj. Photo; Pintu Saha, Audio Visual Officer - SHOUHARDO II

"SHOUHARDO Program - Private Sector's Contribution to Sustainability", 1st prize winner of the global CARE Annual Photo Contest 2010, by Asif U Ahmed, Director, Private Sector Engagement (PSE) Unit

Milk collection trough group activities in Strengthening the Dairy Value Chain Project. Photo: Islam Arafat - Project Officer (L&D), SDVC Project.

Handlooms are their livelihood: Sustainable and inclusive business means a better tomorrow for the Rug workers at Rangpur. Photo: Faisal Khan.

"The Rist of Sangrampur", 3rd prize winner of the global CARE Annual photo contest 2010, by Akram Ali, Project Officer of SDVC Project.

Processing the corn grown as part of Income Generating Activities (IGA) in Tangail. Photo: Pintu Saha, Audio Visual Officer - SHOUHARDO II

An inspiring representation of women's increasing presence in the self-owned business world. Photo: Pintu Saha

'I have started my small business with the seed capital': FSUP-H provides training on income generating activities for women and help them develop small business plans. Photo: Rick Perrera

There are many ways to fight poverty. Isha Khatun of Doani does that through raising chickens. Photo: Pintu Saha

Shunita Rani, a beneficiary of SDVC Project, is counting her profit, made from her feed-selling business. SDVC works with 35,000 smallholder farmers in northwest Bangladesh to double their dairy-related incomes. Photo: Akram Ali

"Musthi Chal" - Savings Handful Rice everyday can make a difference when we do it together. Ultra poor Women of FSUP-H project in the Haor area of Bangladesh has demonstrated this difference. Photo: Robert Rebeiro

'Give us a chance...' : Gaining social legitimacy through sports. Photo: ITSPLEY.

A natural leader representing the poorest is raising issues during Gram Shava (Village Assembly) at Ramnagar, Nilophamari; a space to ensure civic engagement in the Local Govt. decision making process. Photo: Aynul Hoque Pramanik ,SETU Project

Md. Mamunur Rashid, a role model from Nafanagar village, Dinajpur is giving speech during '16 days of activism'. Photo: Hasna Banu - PDO, COVAW Project.

Cost of Violence Against Women (COVAW) Forum Theatre in Tangail, community awareness on resisting Violence Against Women (VAW). Photo: Marium ul Muntahara, L&D Manager - COVAW

An artisan from NCVI - a worker's and artisans owned social enterprise, sewing intricate designs on a scarf in Rangpur, for the Social Economic Transformation of the Ultra Poor (SETU) project. Photo: Ian Taylor

Cultural events of EKATA for Food security for the Ultra-Poor in the Haor region (FSUP-H) in Netrokona, Photo by Chandan Rebeiro

Doulotunnesa, a milk collector of Mahmuder Para Milk Producing and Marketing group, is collecting milk from the group. Photo: Akram Ali

An adolescent girl of Kandu para EKATA group, Rangpur is indicating her expectation during the setting of vision of EKATA to get more education through pictorial expression of Ashar Gach (Tree of Expectation). Photo: Rawshan Rahman

UK Parliament Member Rushanara Ali visits FSUP-H project sites in Kishoreganj. Photo: FSUP-H Project.

SHOUHARDO II beneficiary maintaining her Homestead Garden using skills received from the project. Photo: Pintu Saha - SHOUHARDO II.

Expressions of joy due to the great success of pumpkin cultivation in the barren, unfertile land known as the sandbar. An example of a climate change adaptation measure and economic development opportunity. Photo: Camellya Hasan - PRODUCE Project

Strengthening Poorest and Vulnerable Households Capability to Improve Food Security in Northwest Bangladesh (SHIFT) beneficiary prepares organic feed with her family. Photo: Md. Atikuzzaman, Technical Coordinator, SHIFT

Social Mapping, PRA exercise for SHOUHARDO II Beneficiaries selection - Chilmari Tari, Rangpur. Photo: Pintu Saha, Audio Visual Officer - SHOUHARDO II

Sumitra holds out a radish grown using funds from her community savings group. Using their savings the women are growing vegetables collectively and improving their family's diet. Photo: Richard Sloman

The Village Development Committee (VDC) meeting is one of the key features of SHOUHARDO, which has been replicated in other projects. Photo: Pintu Saha

Children in the ECCD centre used to build them as future leaders on the path of empowerment. Photo: SHOUHARDO II.

Garments workers being taught how to read by a facilitator at the WHEEL learning Center. Photo: Shukdeb Roy - Project Officer, WHEEL Project

Religious leader raising awareness about safe motherhood for the Safe Motherhood Promotional Project (SMPP). Photo: CARE Bangladesh

Community Health Volunteer (CHV) conducting Birth planning (BP) session at PWs home with her other family members

Women discussing maternal health issues within the CmSS model in the Safe Motherhood Promotion Project. Photo: Soman Moodley - Policy and Advocacy Officer, Program Quality Unit.

Food distribution to Pregnant & Lactating Mothers in Tangail; Photo by Pintu Saha, Audio Visual Officer, SHOUHARDO Program

For a mother, no joy is greater than the joy of having a happy and healthy child. Photo: Pintu Saha

Providing household counseling on maternal nutrition, infant and young child feeding, hygiene and care practices is core of the MYCNSI project. Photo: MYCNSI project

An Open Budget Meeting organized by the Damodorpur Union Parishad under Sadullapur upazilla, Gaibandha district. Photo: Md. Sarwar, TC-L&M, EU-Local Governance Project.

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

Floods in Bangladesh: Crisis in South East and North East

CARE Bangladesh distributes food rations to people affected by floods. Photo: CARE

CARE Bangladesh distributes cash money to people affected by floods. Photo: CARE

CARE Bangladesh distributes food rations to disable people affected by floods. Photo: CARE

When disaster strike, many are left homeless. CARE's initiative to build disaster resilient sustainable shelters for the affected families by flood and prolonged water-logging in South West Bangladesh. Photo: Shahidul Islam Khan

Refugees arriving from Rakhine state, Myanmar. Following the recent communal violence in Myanmar has forced more than 670,000 people to flee their homeland and seek asylum in Coxs Bazar, Bangladesh. The people who managed to cross over came with mere belongings, brining only what matters the most, family members and little savings to get by.

Right after their arrival, the refugees from Myanmar were faced with further difficult situation. It was late-monsoon, rain was pouring down and hundreds and thousands of women, children and men were living under open sky. As immediate emergency response, CARE Bangladesh reached out to 2,300 families with umbrellas to fight the monsoon, until basic settlements were set up.

Most of the refugees from Myanmar are settling down in make-shift camps in Kutupalong, Potibunia and others. But the late-monsoon is making still making their daily lives very difficult.

Refugees arriving from Rakhine state, Myanmar. Following the recent communal violence in Myanmar has forced more than 670,000 people to flee their homeland and seek asylum in Coxs Bazar, Bangladesh

CARE has set up a woman friendly space (WFS) at Potibunia Camp in Ukhiya, Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. The WFS supports Myanmar refugee women through counselling, psycho-social support, recreational activities and referral linkage. The WFS has been set up as part of “WASH and Protection Support for Myanmar Emergency in Bangladesh” project, funded by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), Australia. CARE is in the process of setting up some more WFS.

1/16/18 Potibonia Camp. CAREBangladesh.Women Friendly Shelter. Men are not allowed in. The women gather for games and an opportunity to share stories of trauma and need. Taslia [Taslia Akter, local NGO=Prottayashi] works in partnership with CARE.

1/17/18: CARE/FDSR Health Center, Balukhali Camp. Recording: CAREBangladesh_17_01_18_HealthCenterBalukhali.CONSENT.Tayeb (translating): This health center is for all illnesses. They treat pregnant people, diarrhea, and other illnesses also. They’re organizers so basically different people are playing different roles, you know. Some of them are maintaining the registration, the patient is coming and they’re getting the registration from people, and some of them are going outside to encourage people to come here. And once they will get here, she is basically a paramedic. So she will write the prescription, and in those cases they have some doctors here. So this is the role they’re playing here.

CARE Bangladesh, in partnership with the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW) has launched two Temporary Community Clinics for Myanmar refugees to provide sexual and reproductive health and primary health care services. The Clinics will also serve as Immunization (EPI) Centers and offer other government health services for women, men, adolescent and children. FDSR, one of our national partners, is providing support to implement activities on the ground. In line with the MoU signed earlier, the DGHS has committed to provide doctors and free medicines for the Clinics. CARE, on the other hand is responsible for setting up the infrastructure, and providing personnel like paramedics, ambulance services for referral cases and other technical assistance. CARE is thankful to Glaxo SmithKline for funding.

CARE Bangladesh, in partnership with the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW) has launched two Temporary Community Clinics for Myanmar refugees to provide sexual and reproductive health and primary health care services. The Clinics will also serve as Immunization (EPI) Centers and offer other government health services for women, men, adolescent and children. FDSR, one of our national partners, is providing support to implement activities on the ground. In line with the MoU signed earlier, the DGHS has committed to provide doctors and free medicines for the Clinics. CARE, on the other hand is responsible for setting up the infrastructure, and providing personnel like paramedics, ambulance services for referral cases and other technical assistance. CARE is thankful to Glaxo SmithKline for funding.

Potibonia Camp CARE Bangladesh, food distribution happens once in day in some camps, and they feed 8-10,000 people at a time, children first, then everyone else. The bowls and plates were given the refugees when they arrived since most came w nothing, not even cooking supplies.

Caption-CARE Bangladesh has been distributing cooked food - often door to door - to over 3500 people, especially women and children, living in different makeshift camps.

CARE Bangladesh has distributed cooked food - often door to door - to over 3500 people, especially women and children, living in different makeshift camps.

Potibonia Camp CARE Bangladesh, food distribution happens once in day in some camps, and they feed 8-10,000 people at a time, children first, then everyone else. The bowls and plates were given to the refugees when they arrived since most came with nothing, not even cooking supplies.

1/16/18 Potibonia Camp, where CARE's base is. Camp is 22,000 Rohinga refugees, more than half of which are children. One of the key responsibilities of the girls is fetching water many times a day. The girls are often bejeweled and dressed up. Child marriage is very common, most girls getting married between ages 12 and 16, and it is not uncommon to meet an 18 y/o w 2 or 3 children; this tradition is meant to protect the girls from rape and assault, and to begin having children as soon as possible. Few children attend schools and illiteracy rates are very high. Schools in the camps are really just getting started (BRAC), since the initial needs of the refugees - shelter, sanitation and food were first priorities.

CARE Bangladesh has distributed shelter kits and shelter tool kits to 1100 HH between December 21 and 26 in collaboration with our national partner RIC (Resource Integration Centre). With funding from CARE Netherlands and LDS Charities (Latter-day Saints Charities), this was the first round of distribution that took place at Potibonia camp (Safiullahkata/ Maynargona-2). As part of distribution, each family received the followings items: bamboo (24 pieces), rope (30 m), wire (25 m) and 220 sets of Tool Kit (1 for each 5 HHs). The tool box contained claw hammer (2), handsaw (2), machete (2), Tukri/Bamboo basket (5), shovel (2), hoe (2), and digging bar (2). Moreover, CARE has already provided necessary briefing and instructions to 4000 HH (1 from each HH, Male or Female) as to how to use these shelter materials and toolkits effectively to build better and stronger shelters in safer places to avoid risks such as heavy rains and land slide. CARE plans to distribute shelter materials and shelter tool kits to all 5100 HHs living in this camp site, within the next 3 months.

CARE Bangladesh has distributed shelter kits and shelter tool kits to 1100 HH between December 21 and 26 in collaboration with our national partner RIC (Resource Integration Centre). With funding from CARE Netherlands and LDS Charities (Latter-day Saints Charities), this was the first round of distribution that took place at Potibonia camp (Safiullahkata/ Maynargona-2). As part of distribution, each family received the followings items: bamboo (24 pieces), rope (30 m), wire (25 m) and 220 sets of Tool Kit (1 for each 5 HHs). The tool box contained claw hammer (2), handsaw (2), machete (2), Tukri/Bamboo basket (5), shovel (2), hoe (2), and digging bar (2). Moreover, CARE has already provided necessary briefing and instructions to 4000 HH (1 from each HH, Male or Female) as to how to use these shelter materials and toolkits effectively to build better and stronger shelters in safer places to avoid risks such as heavy rains and land slide. CARE plans to distribute shelter materials and shelter tool kits to all 5100 HHs living in this camp site, within the next 3 months.

CARE Bangladesh has distributed shelter kits and shelter tool kits to 1100 HH between December 21 and 26 in collaboration with our national partner RIC (Resource Integration Centre). With funding from CARE Netherlands and LDS Charities (Latter-day Saints Charities), this was the first round of distribution that took place at Potibonia camp (Safiullahkata/ Maynargona-2). As part of distribution, each family received the followings items: bamboo (24 pieces), rope (30 m), wire (25 m) and 220 sets of Tool Kit (1 for each 5 HHs). The tool box contained claw hammer (2), handsaw (2), machete (2), Tukri/Bamboo basket (5), shovel (2), hoe (2), and digging bar (2). Moreover, CARE has already provided necessary briefing and instructions to 4000 HH (1 from each HH, Male or Female) as to how to use these shelter materials and toolkits effectively to build better and stronger shelters in safer places to avoid risks such as heavy rains and land slide. CARE plans to distribute shelter materials and shelter tool kits to all 5100 HHs living in this camp site, within the next 3 months.

CARE Australia Chief Executive Sally Moyle and Oxfam Australia Chief Executive Helen Szoke along with Senator Claire Moore and Senator Sharon Claydon from Australia visited a number of Myanmar Refugee Camps in November 2017. Their visit cover different activity undertaken by CARE e.g. health centers, centers that treat children with severe acute malnutrition, WASH and others.

The interior of a typical shelter for the refugees.

She told no one about it. The only person was her eldest son, who was killed shortly after he got to know. His last memories were of his mother screaming his name after armed men had entered their home. “I sent my children away into the jungle and just went back to lock the door. But I was too late, two men pushed in the door and grabbed me,” Hamida says with tears running down her face. The words thereafter do not leave her lips easily. “They raped me,” she whispers. This was about six months ago, just after Hamida and her husband fled with their remaining children to Bangladesh to seek safety from mass killings and persecution in their village. But her life in the overcrowded camps is not the safe haven she had hoped for. Her husband left her for his other wife and she now looks after her five children by herself. Afraid of the threats she received if she dares to speak ill of him, she keeps quiet. In a camp of today more than 900,000 people, the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar became the site of the world’s fastest growing refugee crisis. Over 680,000 refugees made the perilous journey from neighboring Rakhine State in Myanmar into Bangladesh in just six months escaping violence, death and destruction. The concentration of refugees is now among the densest in the world. CARE has been working in the refugee camps since the beginning of the crisis providing emergency shelter, medical support, clean water, sanitation, gender-based violence support and more.

Arob is sitting in her dark and humid tent by herself. For the 17-year old, the four thin plastic and iron walls have become the boundaries of her new home and freedom. She is only allowed to leave these 8 sqm for about one hour a day. “Women are supposed to stay inside. My husband does not want me to go outside, where other men could see me,” Arob says quietly. She is not the only one in the camp of over 300,000 newly arrived women in Bangladesh facing such limitations. In a camp of today more than 900,000 people, the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar became the site of the world’s fastest growing refugee crisis. Over 680,000 refugees made the perilous journey from neighboring Rakhine State in Myanmar into Bangladesh in just six months escaping violence, death and destruction. The concentration of refugees is now among the densest in the world. CARE has been working in the refugee camps since the beginning of the crisis providing emergency shelter, medical support, clean water, sanitation, gender-based violence support and more.

1/16/18 Potibonia Camp, where CARE's base is. Camp is 22,000 Rohinga refugees, more than half of which are children. One of the key responsibilities of the girls is fetching water many times a day. The girls are often bejeweled and dressed up. Child marriage is very common, most girls getting married between ages 12 and 16, and it is not uncommon to meet an 18 y/o w 2 or 3 children; this tradition is meant to protect the girls from rape and assault, and to begin having children as soon as possible. Few children attend schools and illiteracy rates are very high. Schools in the camps are really just getting started (BRAC), since the initial needs of the refugees - shelter, sanitation and food were first priorities.

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